Infographic Friday: Are You Scaring Off New Patients with Monstrous Lead Management?

Vampires, zombies and ghosts, oh my. Another Halloween has come and gone but the seasonal scare-fest still serves as a timely reminder that you don’t need a fright wig or face paint to scare off new customers. Poor lead management, in fact, has probably killed off so much new business it could probably spawn a new movie franchise called The Monsters of Lead Loss.

Or at least, an entertaining infographic like this one from ReachLocal.com, which categorizes some of the ways that even well-run businesses let good leads wither or walk away:

infogrraphic, lead management

It should go without saying that once a lead is lost, it’s probably lost for good. And as every horror movie since the dawn of time has demonstrated, running away is seldom a successful strategy. Instead, as the folks at ReachLocal suggest, the best bet is to take appropriate precautions to avoid such problems in the first place.

How? By ensuring someone is available to answer the phone (and respond to email inquiries), by equipping those people with enough background about your practice that they can handle the full breadth of patient inquiries knowledgeably and by training them to collect enough information from each lead (e.g., name, phone number, email address and nature of inquiry) to determine an appropriate course of action.

Information, after all, is power and with the above in hand, you’ll be empowered to determine whether individual inquiries represent hot leads that warrant immediate follow-up or warm ones that may be better suited for the occasional email reminder. Either way, you’re likely to experience better conversions in the long run while rendering the monsters of lead loss about as scary as a porch-ful of pint-sized trick or treaters.

About Rob Lovitt

Rob Lovitt is a longtime writer and editor who believes every good business has a great story to tell. He has written for dozens of magazines and websites, including NBCnews.com, Expedia.com and the inflight magazines of Alaska, Horizon and Frontier airlines.

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